Niching Versus Knowing Or As I Like To Call It 'The Great Niche Conundrum of The 21 Century'

'So my business coach told me I needed to pick a niche, so now I’m only working with woman who are ex-acapella singers who’ve graduated from Bardem University... but it’s not working. I’m not getting clients and ya know what? I hate working with ex acapella singers, they turn everything I say into a song. It’s sooo annoying.'

The Niche.

The most dreaded word in the business world, sending business owners running with terror.

You’ll never make any money unless you niche.

You’ll never be known for something unless you niche.

You’ll never run a successful business unless you niche.

Oh but you are wrong.

Those business coaches who’re banging on about your niche have gotten it wrong.

Your niche is not your competitive edge.

Your niche is not your unique selling proposition.

Your niche is not why someone is going to pick working with you.

Your niche is part of your marketing plan and as such it gives you direction on how you show up and how you communicate.

But your niche is not going to get you booked out with a wait list of clients and running a successful business.

During the madness that I’m going to call ‘The Great Niche Conundrum of The 21 Century’ the business world has taken one very simple principle of marketing and turned it into the one and only thing you need to do to get paid.

Not true.

And let’s get real, picking a particular trait about someone hasn’t worked so far, so let’s just ignore this piece of advice for a hot minute, shall we?

It’s not about who you work with. It’s about what you know about them.

It’s not about their traits. It’s about what’s going on for them.

It’s about knowing their perspective and their worldview.

It’s about knowing how they perceive the world round them in relation to what you’re selling.

If you’re a leadership coach, you can work both with corporate women and those who’re entrepreneurs if they share a viewpoint on leadership and if they want the same thing.

E.g. if they both want to viewed as a leader of their community and lead by example in their life.

If you’re a nutritionist, you can work both with fitness enthusiasts and those who just want to stop being bloated if they share a viewpoint on nutrition and if they want the same thing.

E.g. if they both want to understand how they can solve their issues via nutrition instead of medication.

If you’re a copywriter, you can work both with life coaches and plumbers if they share a viewpoint on copywriting and if they want the same thing.

E.g If they both believe the reason their sales are lacking is because of their communication skills.

Yes, you need to know who you’re talking to, but only in relation to how they perceive the world and specifically how they perceive what you’re selling.

It’s about understanding their viewpoint, and talking to that viewpoint.

And guess what?

Corporates and business owners can share a viewpoint.

Weight loss wanters and marathon runners can share a viewpoint.

Plumbers and life coaches can share a viewpoint.

Find the viewpoint.

Find the shared perception.

Filter your business through that perception.

Your niche is one piece of your business pie, but it’s not the whole pie.

Choosing your niche doesn’t automatically cut out competition nor does it mean your niche is now the reason why someone is going to pick you.

So then, how do you seperate yourself from the competition?

It’s you.

It’s how you perceive the world.

It’s how you perceive what you’re doing.

It’s how you want to show up.

It’s what you want to be know for.

It’s how you want people to perceive you.

Your niche isn't your competitive edge. Your niche isn't the thing that's going to make you stand out. Your niche isn't going to make you the worthy choice.

Your niche gives you a knowledge about who you're talking to.

What makes you the worthy choice?

YOU, your quirks, your thoughts, your opinions, your word choices and how to choose to show up.